An Interview with Jason Francisco, Part 3: Płaszów, A Camp in Its Afterlives

  Jason Francisco’s photography spans a variety of subjects and themes, but some of his ongoing projects take on the complexities of memory and loss in Eastern Europe, particularly memory and loss related to the Holocaust. Francisco recently sat down for an interview with Matthew H. Brittingham, an Emory PhD candidate and associate editor at Sacred Matters. The two discussed Francisco’s photographs on a former Nazi-controlled WWII camp in Krakow, Poland, known as Płaszów. This is part three of a three part interview with Professor Francisco. See: Part one and part two. Professor Francisco’s photography and writing can be seen at his website. For […]

An Interview with Jason Francisco, Part 1: Photographing the “Sacred” in “Alive and Destroyed”

  Jason Francisco received his MFA in Photography from Stanford University in 1998 and is presently an Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at Emory University. Professor Francisco’s photography spans a variety of subjects and themes, but several of his ongoing projects examine the complexities of memory and loss in Eastern Europe, particularly memory and loss related to the destruction of Eastern European Jewry as part of the Holocaust. Some of Jason Francisco’s projects have been running for almost a decade, if not longer, continuously being updated, reimagined, and re-theorized when he revisits Eastern Europe. Francisco wrestles with loss […]

Eddie Glaude on Black Religious Life and Politics: Parts 2 and 3

Glaude discusses here how African-American religious life can facilitate a response to political problems and he introduces a key concept called the “value gap,” or, “belief that white people are valued more than others,” from his latest book Democracy in Black. 

Eddie Glaude on Race and The American Soul: Part 1

Beginning with a distinction between African American religions and African American religious life, Professor Glaude explains how black religious life and thought have historically entered public discourse to mediate matters of race and justice.

7 Questions for Matthew Avery Sutton

Matthew Avery Sutton I was not terribly interested in defining religion or the sacred. My focus was on how what my subjects would define as their religious beliefs and convictions functioned. I focused on the work that their religion did.